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Discover LA: The Griffith Observatory

The Griffith Observatory is must-do for any trip to LA. 

I grew up going to the Griffith Observatory and every time I go, I am in awe of its beauty. Nestled at the top of Los Angeles’ Griffith Park, the Observatory is one of the most iconic landmarks in Southern California. The Observatory is built on land that was donated to the City of Los Angeles in 1896 by Griffith J. Griffith. His intent was to develop an observatory to make the art of astronomy accessible for all to enjoy. And since its opening in 1935, the Observatory has offered free admission to tourists and locals alike. Fun Fact: within the Observatory’s first five days of operation (in 1935!), they logged over 13,000 visitors. Clearly, people were interested in learning more about the stars!

These days, the Griffith Observatory is an incredibly popular destination for school field trips, photo shoots and hikes.

At Griffith, you can look through telescopes, explore exhibits, see live shows in the planetarium. Free public star parties (star parties!!) are held monthly with the assistance of local astronomical volunteers. At these star parties, you can look at the sun, moon, visible planets and other objects. You can also try out a variety of telescopes and talk to knowledgeable amateur astronomers about the sky.

Not only has the iconic structure been featured in countless films throughout the decades, the surrounding areas host miles of hiking trails. On a clear day, you can see all the way to the ocean. In addition, if you hike high enough you can see the Hollywood sign.

The Observatory itself, as mentioned, is free of charge. So visiting is a great way to spend the day with family and friends. Make sure to bring a camera – the views from the top are breathtaking! (This is also a great spot for a free date night! I mean, the views are so romantic!)

Have you made it up to The Griffith Observatory? Tag us in your pics; we’d love to see!

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